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Jan 29 2014

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Kangaroo Maze

Kangaroo Maze

Kangaroo Maze

The kangaroo, like most marsupials, has a pouch to carry its young while they grow. There are about 50 species of kangaroos, all originating in Australia or the nearby islands. The best known of these is the red kangaroo that can grow to over 6 feet tall and reach speeds of 35 miles per hour. The smaller varieties of kangaroos are known as wallabies.

  • Over 95% of the animals indigenous to Australia are marsupials. The wide variety of ecosystems on the continent encouraged a wide variety of species development. Kangaroos are common in the Australian outback.

  • Male kangaroos are known as boomers, females are called fliers. Joey is the word for a young kangaroo. Male kangaroos are bigger than females; females are faster.

  • When the baby kangaroo is born it is less than inch long. Hairless, blind and with no back legs it crawls against gravity for about 3 minutes until it reaches its mother’s pouch and falls in. It stays there and develops for up to 9 months growing into a joey.

  • The quality of the mother’s milk varies as the baby grows to meet its nutritional needs. Sometimes there will be two young in the pouch of very different ages and each will get different milk from a separate nipple to exactly meet its needs. After a joey leaves the pouch for the first time it will return to shelter there many times for up to a year more before becoming completely independent.

  • Kangaroos eat grass and other vegetation. They can survive for months without drinking water.

  • A group of kangaroos is called a mob. They are social animals and live in groups of at least 2 or 3 individuals. Sometimes there will be over 100 kangaroos in a mob.

Here is the solution to the Kangaroo Maze.

Download a PDF of the Kangaroo Maze here!

You can buy a greeting card with this design on it here.

The original artwork is drawn with Faber-Castell india ink on a piece of 7″ x 10″ Canson mix media paper by Rob Hughes.

Permanent link to this article: http://heretoamaze.com/2014/01/29/kangaroo-maze/

1 comment

  1. Robert Hughes
    Robert Hughes

    Did you notice the heart in the kangaroo’s nose?

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